Hey

so you bought an item at Mykke Hofmann? That’s great! We’re happy to say that at the same time, you’ve also bought a piece of responsibility, if you want.
Because…

Hey

so you bought an item at Mykke Hofmann? That’s great! We’re happy to say that at the same time, you’ve also bought a piece of responsibility, if you want. Because…

You've got the power

You've got the power

Fashion is one of the biggest polluters of our planet. The industry faces a tremendous need for sustainable alternatives, which is good and necessary. But do not forget that: you are part of the game! You can help changing the status quo not only with your purchasing decisions, but also how you care for your garments after purchase. Maybe you didn’t know that a bigger part of a garments carbon footprint happens “at home”?
We want to give you a little guidance and inspiration on how to properly care for your garment and what to take into consideration.

Fashion is one of the biggest polluters of our planet. The industry faces a tremendous need for sustainable alternatives, which is good and necessary. But do not forget that: you are part of the game! You can help changing the status quo not only with your purchasing decisions, but also how you care for your garments after purchase. Maybe you didn’t know that a bigger part of a garments carbon footprint happens “at home”?

We want to give you a little guidance and inspiration on how to properly care for your garment and what to take into consideration.

Use cold water.

Yes, it is that easy – think twice before you throw something into your loundry bag. One machine wash uses up between 50 and 80 litres of water. For little stains, try using a spot cleaner.

Eco detergent.

You can either create your own detergent (there’s plenty recipes for making detergents with soap, natriumbicorbonate, aetheric oils and a bit of water) or at least shop a sustainable one at the next organic shop.

No drier.

The only thing you need to dry your clothes is a little bit of space and dry air. Why use so much energy to dry your clothes? Also, skipping the dryer will help prevent fiber degradation.

Freeze your denim.

Simply throw your jeans into the freezer for one or two days, this will kill bacteria and odours and freshen it up.

Use cold water.

Yes, it is that easy – think twice before you throw something into your loundry bag. One machine wash uses up between 50 and 80 litres of water. For little stains, try using a spot cleaner.

Use a guppyfriend bag.

You probably might have heard of Microplastic – that tiny tiny pieces of plastic debris in the environment resulting from the disposal and breakdown of consumer products, especially garments based on synthetic fibres. When you wash your clothes, those microplastics pass your washing machines filter and get into groundwater and into the sea. Microplastics then get into our foodchain, and into our belly. You dont want plastic in your belly, do you?

Guppybags keep plastics out of the water.

Green dry clean.

Yes, a few garments are a little more demanding in care. If you really have to bring your stuff to a dry cleaner, who dont you check if there is a dry cleaner offering “green dry” somewhere around? This type of cleaning can substantially reduce toxicity and CO2 emissions associated with garment care. The primary chemical solvent used in dry-cleaning, perchloroethylene (or perc), is a toxic chemical capable of causing liver damage and respiratory failure, it can also lead to groundwater contamination and air pollution. So be sure to ask your dry cleaner to not use perc.

Green laundry detergent.

You can either create your own detergent (there’s plenty recipes for making detergents with soap, natriumbicorbonate, aetheric oils and a bit of water) or at least shop a sustainable one at the next organic shop.

Use cold water.

Yes, it is that easy – think twice before you throw something into your loundry bag. One machine wash uses up between 50 and 80 litres of water. For little stains, try using a spot cleaner.

Use a guppyfriend bag.

You probably might have heard of Microplastic – that tiny tiny pieces of plastic debris in the environment resulting from the disposal and breakdown of consumer products, especially garments based on synthetic fibres. When you wash your clothes, those microplastics pass your washing machines filter and get into groundwater and into the sea. Microplastics then get into our foodchain, and into our belly. You dont want plastic in your belly, do you?

Guppybags keep plastics out of the water.

Green laundry detergent.

You can either create your own detergent (there’s plenty recipes for making detergents with soap, natriumbicorbonate, aetheric oils and a bit of water) or at least shop a sustainable one at the next organic shop.

Green dry clean.

Yes, a few garments are a little more demanding in care. If you really have to bring your stuff to a dry cleaner, who dont you check if there is a dry cleaner offering “green dry” somewhere around? This type of cleaning can substantially reduce toxicity and CO2 emissions associated with garment care. The primary chemical solvent used in dry-cleaning, perchloroethylene (or perc), is a toxic chemical capable of causing liver damage and respiratory failure, it can also lead to groundwater contamination and air pollution. So be sure to ask your dry cleaner to not use perc.

Second Hand.

You do have the budget to shop designer clothes, many young girls don’t. So they simply shop at Zara and H&M.

Regularly cleanse your closet and pull out styles you don’t really wear. But please refrain from donating them to some third world charity. The people there mostly need food and medicine and clean water, no designer dresses, and of your donated garments only 10-20% will make it into the hands of a new owner, most of it will be downcycled to insulation or rags. Or simply rot. (Council for Textile Recycling, 2018) Instead, look for the nicest second hand shops in town or vintage-apps or ebay…. and pass your treasures on.

No drier.

The only thing you need to dry your clothes is a little bit of space and dry air. Why use so much energy to dry your clothes? Also, skipping the dryer will help prevent fiber degradation.

No drier.

The only thing you need to dry your clothes is a little bit of space and dry air. Why use so much energy to dry your clothes? Also, skipping the dryer will help prevent fiber degradation.

Second Hand.

You do have the budget to shop designer clothes, many young girls don’t. So they simply shop at Zara and H&M.

Regularly cleanse your closet and pull out styles you don’t really wear. But please refrain from donating them to some third world charity. The people there mostly need food and medicine and clean water, no designer dresses, and of your donated garments only 10-20% will make it into the hands of a new owner, most of it will be downcycled to insulation or rags. Or simply rot. (Council for Textile Recycling, 2018) Instead, look for the nicest second hand shops in town or vintage-apps or ebay…. and pass your treasures on.

Freeze your denim.

Simply throw your jeans into the freezer for one or two days, this will kill bacteria and odours and freshen it up.

Don't iron.

Doesn’t that sound wonderful? Let’s be honest – NO ONE likes to iron.

Also our nature doesn’t want you to iron. It’s an unnecessary waste of energy. And time. So why don’t you just spend an extra 2 minutes on hanging your clothes more accurately after washing them. Also, the best traveller trick works really well: while taking a hot shower, hang your garment in the bathroom.

Don't iron.

Doesn’t that sound wonderful? Let’s be honest – NO ONE likes to iron.

Also our nature doesn’t want you to iron. It’s an unnecessary waste of energy. And time. So why don’t you just spend an extra 2 minutes on hanging your clothes more accurately after washing them. Also, the best traveller trick works really well: while taking a hot shower, hang your garment in the bathroom.

Freeze your denim.

Simply throw your jeans into the freezer for one or two days, this will kill bacteria and odours and freshen it up.

Don't iron.

Doesn’t that sound wonderful? Let’s be honest – NO ONE likes to iron.

Also our nature doesn’t want you to iron. It’s an unnecessary waste of energy. And time. So why don’t you just spend an extra 2 minutes on hanging your clothes more accurately after washing them. Also, the best traveller trick works really well: while taking a hot shower, hang your garment in the bathroom.

Green dry clean.

Yes, a few garments are a little more demanding in care. If you really have to bring your stuff to a dry cleaner, who dont you check if there is a dry cleaner offering “green dry” somewhere around? This type of cleaning can substantially reduce toxicity and CO2 emissions associated with garment care. The primary chemical solvent used in dry-cleaning, perchloroethylene (or perc), is a toxic chemical capable of causing liver damage and respiratory failure, it can also lead to groundwater contamination and air pollution. So be sure to ask your dry cleaner to not use perc.

Use a guppyfriend bag.

You probably might have heard of Microplastic – that tiny tiny pieces of plastic debris in the environment resulting from the disposal and breakdown of consumer products, especially garments based on synthetic fibres. When you wash your clothes, those microplastics pass your washing machines filter and get into groundwater and into the sea. Microplastics then get into our foodchain, and into our belly. You dont want plastic in your belly, do you?

Guppybags keep plastics out of the water.

Second Hand.

You do have the budget to shop designer clothes, many young girls don’t. So they simply shop at Zara and H&M.

Regularly cleanse your closet and pull out styles you don’t really wear. But please refrain from donating them to some third world charity. The people there mostly need food and medicine and clean water, no designer dresses, and of your donated garments only 10-20% will make it into the hands of a new owner, most of it will be downcycled to insulation or rags. Or simply rot. (Council for Textile Recycling, 2018) Instead, look for the nicest second hand shops in town or vintage-apps or ebay…. and pass your treasures on.

Last but not least: Be careful with you garments and embrace change

It is important to know that a few fabrics – especially natural ones- age quicker than others. They are more delicate than their synthetic brothers. Sometimes there are a few anti-ageing strategies, sometimes there are none.

In a nutshell: being a sustainable fashion-consumer is pretty much about acting like people would have 100 years ago, before globalization and mass production kicked in. It is very much based on knowing a garment’s worth and not treating it as a commodity. Knowledge is power so educate yourself on the impact your decisions have and be ready to take an extra effort sometimes.

Buy less, choose well, make it last!